Saturday, August 16, 2014

Grandma Willie's Apron

John Robert Richards, Jr.
Willie Homsley Richards
John Robert "Bob" Richards
Circa 1955-1956

Grandma's Apron

I don't think our kids know what an apron is.

The principal use of Grandma's apron was to protect the dress underneath, because she only had a few, it was easier to wash aprons than dresses and they used less material, but along with that, it served as a potholder for removing hot pans from the oven.

It was wonderful for drying children's tears, and on occasion was even used for cleaning out dirty ears…

From the chicken coop, the apron was used for carrying eggs, fussy chicks, and sometimes half-hatched eggs to be finished in the warming oven.

When company came, those aprons were ideal hiding places for shy kids.

And when the weather was cold grandma wrapped it around her arms.

Those big old aprons wiped many a perspiring brow, bent over the hot wood stove.

Chips and kindling wood were brought into the kitchen in that apron.

From the garden, it carried all sorts of vegetables.

After the peas had been shelled, it carried out the hulls.

In the fall, the apron was used to bring in apples that had fallen from the trees.

When unexpected company drove up the road, it was surprising how much furniture that old apron could dust in a matter of seconds.

When dinner was ready, Grandma walked out onto the porch, waved her apron, and the men-folk knew it was time to come in from the fields to dinner.

It will be a long time before someone invents something that will replace that 'old-time apron' that served so many purposes.


REMEMBER:

Grandma used to set her hot baked apple pies on the window sill to cool.
Her granddaughters set theirs on the window sill to thaw.
They would go crazy now trying to figure out how many germs were on that apron.

I never caught anything from an apron…But Love.
 (Author Unknown)

The above narrative about "Grandma's Apron" was shared with us by my first cousin and Willie's granddaughter, Teresa Haws Clements. Several of us who were old enough to remember Grandma Richards remember her wearing her aprons. I was hoping to find a better picture, but she seemed to have taken them off when she was asked to be in family photos. Good for her! The tiny photo above was found in Aunt Betty Richards' photos several years ago when Betty was sharing her pictures with me. I scanned them and gave them back to her. This one was obviously loved a lot ~ had many little scratches and discolorations, but I have chosen not to retouch it. At first, I wasn't sure Grandma was wearing an apron; on second and third look, I believe she was. I will let you draw your own conclusion. Uncle Johnny (Aunt Betty's future husband) looks to be around sixteen or seventeen years old to me, making the picture Circa 1955-56. In the 1940 census the family lived in Parker County, Texas.

Saturday, May 24, 2014

A Family Tribute to ~ Thank You for Your Service ~ SSgt T. C. Cox, KIA 5 December 1943

 
T. C. Cox and Dorothy Culwell Cox
with their son
T. C. "Skip" Cox
Circa Mid-1942

T. C.and Dorothy were married in Stephenville, Erath Co., Texas
on 20 April 1941 and Skip was born 22 March 1942.
SSgt T. C. Cox KIA 5 December 1943 Mignano, Caserta Province, Campania, Italy

The third T. C., Troy C. Cox, grandson of SSgt T. C. Cox, told me of the path that his grandpa took after joining the Texas National Guard. He joined the Texas National Guard before 25 November 1940, in Stephenville, Texas.

Troy received some information about the last few days his grandfather was with his battalion. A copy of his file card shows:

"...your grandfather joined the Texas National Guard before November 25th 1940. That is the date they were brought into federal service, so his TNG records would be here on post with retained records. It would only cover the time from his enlistment to Nov. 25, 1940. Company D, 142nd Infantry was based in Stephenville, Texas before the war.

It shows a Good Conduct Medal, Combat Infantryman Badge, and Purple Heart. It shows he was KIA on December 5, 1943. From the 142bs Infantry After Action Report for that date. 



" On the 5th of December the Special Service Force reported a strong German counterattack early in the morning on their right flank, which was repulsed.  At 1000 the 1st and 2nd Battalion commanders (company D is 1st battalion) were informed as follows: It is planned to move the 1st Battalion to an assembly area in the vicinity of the southern slope of MT. LA DIFENSA under the cover of darkness tonight with the future mission of relieving the 1st Special Service Force. Company "I" will relieve Company "A". The positions of Company "B" and "C" will be vacated but will be patrolled by the 2nd Battalion.

Information was then received at the Command Post that the British were on Hill 619 and had a company within four hundred yards of the monastery but did not have their objective. At 1840 it was reported that the 1st Special Service Force had taken hill 907 at 2000, due to enemy shelling all wire lines were out to the 1st and 2nd Battalions, ...During the night it was estimated that one hundred forty-five rounds of enemy fire fell on the pack trail and was quite heavy in the valley.”
Lisa Sharik
Deputy Director
Texas Military Forces Museum




From what I’m able to read from the AAR's (After Action Reports) 142nd 1st Battalion was conducting patrol up and down the mountain. Grandpa just missed being relieved by an Italian Brigade according to the AAR's.

From the 1st Bn, 142nd's unit Journal:
At dawn on 3 Dec, the 142nd infantry, the Special Services Force, which was composed of American and Canadian troops, and the British, launched an attack against German positions in the M. Camino Mt. Maggiore hill mass, with the aid of allied artillery, initial objectives were taken and the units participating drove on to further objectives.
4 Dec,
Active patrols were maintained and all units were alerted for a possible German counter-attack against forces on Mt. Maggiore which had driven the enemy from the greater proportion of the hill mass.
5 Dec.
The company "9" outpost line was hit by German patrol at 0300 hours. Company B opened fire and the Germans retaliated with machine pistol and rifle grenade fire. The enemy force was unable to penetrate into the Company B position and quickly withdrew.
On the morning of 5 Dec. Battalion Staff officers were getting instruction regarding relief of their battalions by the 1st Italian Motorized Brigade. Patrols returned from 1st and 3rd BN after making daylight recon of enemy territory with info on machine gun, mortar, artillery emplacements.
6 Dec.
The 1st Italian troops to enter as American Allies relieved the troops on Mt. Lungo that morning, 1st Bn was not relieved until the night of 6 Dec.


Grandpa T. C. was killed on that mountain - Mt. Maggiore on 5 December 1943. "Mt. Maggiore became known as the "million dollar mountain" because of the huge amount of ammunition expended, and artillerymen called the barrage the 'Serenade to Mussolini and Hitler'". For Christmas last year my parents gave me some letters from him to my grandmother Dot and many from her to him that have never been opened since they sent the letters back to her after he was killed. They are still tied together with the ribbon she tied them with before putting them away.  I also have the Western Union Telegram they sent to my grandmother announcing his death.
The day T. C. died, December 5, was a Sunday after the bombings of Mt. Maggiore started on the evening of December 2. This mountain is near the community of Mignano which is about 18-20 miles southeast of Cassino, where they say T. C. was first interred. That cemetery is no longer there, because all U. S. servicemen that were not sent home for burial were moved to a U. S. military cemetery in Florence when they started re-interring the bodies in 1947. The U. S. bodies were brought down the mountain by mules, but the Italian muleskinners would not bring them down, because they thought it was bad luck to lead the mules down with dead bodies on them, so servicemen did it. If Grandpa T. C. had made it home like Mama Dot kept hoping for, the 36th was home in Texas December 1945, it would have been 2 more years of her waiting for him to come home. I think she would have gladly waited.

T. C. COX
Texas
Staff Sgt 142 Inf 36 Div
World War II
Jan 5 1915 - Dec 5 1945

Johnsville Cemetery
Erath County, Texas

Johnsville Cemetery
Land for cemetery given by T. C.'s Grandparents
Edward and Mary Shaw Cox

Sources:
Pictures:
Originals belonging to Troy C. Cox, digital format used, sent to Judith Richards Shubert
Notes:
Personal Family Information, T. C. "Skip" Cox
Personal Family Information, Troy C. Cox
Texas Military Forces Museum, http://texasmilitaryforcesmuseum.yuku.com/topic/1840/142nd-Co-D#.U4DnI9JdVO0

______________

The URL for this post is
http://genealogytraces.blogspot.com/2014/05/a-family-tribute-to-thank-you-for-your.html

Copyright 2014: Judith Richards Shubert




Friday, May 23, 2014

For the Honor Roll Project at Nutfield Genealogy ~ Person County, North Carolina

"THE HONOR ROLL PROJECT is an effort to transcribe and photograph military honor rolls. The transcribed names make the soldiers available for search engines, so that descendants and family members can find them on the internet. It is a simple but very rewarding project."  If you would like to participate, leave a comment on the founder's blog, Nutfield Genealogy here, or an email at vrojomit@gmail.com. 
You can see the 2014 list at Nutfield Genealogy here.
 This is my first contribution to Heather Wilkinson Rojo's Honor Roll Project.

Person County Court House
Roxboro, Person County, North Carolina
According to Wikipedia Person County, located in the state of North Carolina had a population of 39,464 at the time of the 2010 U.S. census. The county seat is Roxboro and that is where I found these beautiful War Memorials yesterday.  I live twenty-five miles from the little town that has some of the most gorgeous period homes I have ever seen. My son-in-law works there as a fire-fighter. There are many friends and family members there and in Person and Orange counties who have connections on these War Memorials.
The front of the Court House was fronted by a semi-circle of memorials, from the Confederate Soldiers to the Vietnam War and the wars in-between.

Nearly 1000 soldiers from Person County fought for the Confederate Army during the Civil War. An impressive monument overlooks the city placed there by the Person County United Daughters of the Confederacy to honor Confederate Soldiers.


 Erected by Person County
Chapter United Daughters
of the Confederacy


OUR CONFEDERATE SOLDIERS
1861 - 1865

The granite monument below at the Person County Courthouse honors E. Fletcher Satterfield, who advanced the Confederate flag at Gettysburg, and it also names others from the area at that battlefield.

CAPT. E. FLETCHER SATTERFIELD
CO. H, 55th, N. C. REGIMENT
FARTHEST AT GETTYSBURG – KILLED IN ACTION
JUNE 17, 1837 – JULY 3, 1863
Capt. James C. Bailey
Co. H. 24th. N. C Regiment.
Capt. John G. Dillehay,
Co. A. 24th. N. C. Regiment.
Capt. James A. Burch,
Co. A. 50th. N. C. Regiment.
Capt. Carter Day
Co. E. 35th. N. C. Regiment
Capt. Haywood W. Harris
Co. E. 35th, N. C. Regiment
Capt. J. W. Philpott,
Co. E. 35th. N. C.
Capt. James Holeman
Co. A, 24th Regiment N. C.
Erected by the Person County Chapter of the U.D.C. May 9, 1931

ROBERT LESTER BLACKWELL
Born Oct. 4, 1895
SON OF A TENANT FARMER

On October 11, 1918, near St. Souplet, France, his unit Co. K. 119th Inf, 30th Div. was cut off and faced destruction. The officer in charge sent a man for help, he was killed, he sent another, and he was killed. He then called for volunteers. Lester tried to get through. He lost his life. For this he was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor.



Dedicated to the men and women
of Person County who served
in the Armed Forces of the United States of America
during World War II 
World War II - 1941-1945
Donated by the Citizens of Person County 
and the Rotary Club of Roxboro - May 30, 2009





PERSON COUNTY
VETERANS MEMORIAL
1979
IN GRATEFUL MEMORY OF THESE WHO GAVE
THEIR LIVES IN SERVICE OF THEIR COUNTRY

1917 – WWI – 1918
U.S. ARMY
1/Lt. Bailey, William C.
Pvt. Blackwell, Robert L.      
Pvt. Brown, Lex C.
Pfc. Childress, Willie
Pvt. Clayton, Henderson 
Pfc. Deahazo, Arthur
Pvt. Dixon, David C.
Pvt. Evans, Joseph C.
Pvt. Franklin, Benjamin J.
Pvt. Humphrey, Charlie H.
Pfc. Long, Leonard J.
Sgt. Merritt, Fletcher W.
Pfc. Paylor, Bennie H.
Pvt. Rimmer, Dallas
Pvt. Terrell, Charlie
Pvt. Wilborn, George T.
Pvt. Wilborn, Johnnie 
Pfc. Williams, Hugh A.
Lt. Winstead, Guy J.
Pvt. Woody, Robert L

1941 - WWII - 1945
U.S. ARMY
Pfc. Blalock, Coy
Pvt. Bohanon, Andrew J. 
Pvt. Breeze, Thomas Jr.
T/Sgt. Broach, William E.
Pvt. Broadwell, Ben F. 
Pfc. Brown, Emory A. 
Pvt. Carver, Claude E.
Sgt. Carver, Raymond P.
Pfc. Clayton, Calvin C.
Pvt. Day, Landon B. 
Pvt. Denny, Eugene U. 
Pfc. Duncan, Eldridge B.
T/Sgt. Duncan, William H. 
Pfc. Fisher, Sam C.
S/Sgt. Gregory, Coy W. 
Pfc. Harris, Garland 
Pvt. Hubbard, John J.
Pfc. Huff, Lewell T. 
Pvt. Jackson, Francis M. 
Pfc. Jordan, William A.
T/5 Lawson, Dallas
Pfc. Merritt, William J. 
S/Sgt. Moore, James W. Jr.
Pfc. Morris, Walter M.
Pvt. Morris, William R. 
Pfc. Oakley, Allen L.
Pvt. Oakley, Melvin J. 
Pvt. O'Briant, Harold J.
Pvt. Johnson, Charlie A.
S/Sgt. Pearce, Hubery F.
Pvt. Pulliam, Clarence B.
Pfc. Satterfield, James A.
T/5 Saunders, Henry R.
Pfc. Shanko, Louis J.
Pfc. Shotwell, Elwood M.
Pfc. Stephens, Robert H.
Pfc. Walthall, David C.
Pfc. Whitfield, Bernard R.
Pfc. Wilborn, John W.
Pfc. Wilkins, Owen M.
T/Sgt. Winstead, Ralph L.

U.S. ARMY AIR FORCE
S/Sgt. Allen, Henry C.
Cpl. Anderson, Harold R
1/Lt. Bullock, William C. Jr.
Pvt. Chambers, John M.
Sgt. Clayton, Burleigh G. Jr.
S/Sgt. Day, Philip B.
1/Lt. Frederick, Wm. Ransome 
S/Sgt. Harris, George
S/Sgt. Moore, James W. Jr
S/Sgt. Satterfield, Luther S. 
S/Sgt. Shepherd, Elmo W.
Pfc. Taylor, James W. Jr.
Sgt. Todd, Royal P.
Pfc. Umstead, Sam P.
1/Lt Whitefield, Edwin L.
S/Sgt. Whitt, Clyde G.

U.S. NAVY
FIC Bryant, Lawrence E.
S/IC Russell, Reuben R.
CPO, Wirtz, George W.

U.S. MARINE C.
Sgt. Swanson, James W.

1950 - KOREA - 1954 
U.S. ARMY
Pfc. Dunn, James W.
Sp/4 Lungford, Lemmie W.
* William S. Melton *
2/Lt. Wilkerson, Gordon M.


   1963  -  VIETNAM - 1973    
U.S. ARMY                                
2/Lt. Bray, William R.                  
S/Sgt. Drewery, Nolan F.            
Pfc. Ellis, Baxter H.                     .
Pfc. Gentry, Michael L.                                                           
Pvt. Lawson, Dallas O.                                                          
Sp/4 Shouff, James L.          
Sp/4 Wilde, William L.          
Spc/4 Lunsford, Lemmie D.          
Sp/4 Wilson, Sylvester          

U.S. MARINES
L/Cpl. Andrews, Michael W.
Pfc. Lawson, Raymond G. 
L/Cpl. Wilborn, Charlie L.

U.S. AIR FORCE
Capt. Gravitte, Connie M.

* MEDAL OF HONOR *
Contributions by Relatives, Friends, and Members
of Lewell T. Huff Post 2058
Veterans of Foreign Wars of the U.S.A.
Made This Possible.





 KOREA
THE FORGOTTEN WAR
REMEMBERED
25 June 1950 - 27 July 1953
To all who answered our nation's call and to so many
who paid the ultimate price to keep a tiny nation free.
U. S. Troops - 1,789,000 Served
54,246 Dead
7,140 POW
8,177 MIA
103,284 Wounded
FREEDOM IS NOT FREE

Military Insignias:
Department of the Army United States of America
Department of the Air Force
United States Coast Guard
United States Marine Corps Department of the Navy
United States Merchant Marine
United States of America Department of the Navy

Adam Daniel Moore
Eagle Service Project



Sources:
Wikipedia,  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Person_County,_North_Carolina, information on Person County
.
Photographs
All photographs taken by and belonging to Judith Richards Shubert May 21, 2014; digital format used. Names and information transcribed by Judith Richards Shubert.

----------------------------------

The URL for this post is
http://genealogytraces.blogspot.com/2014/05/for-honor-roll-project-at-nutfield.html

Copyright 2014: Judith Richards Shubert

Saturday, May 3, 2014

Stratford Wade Hampton Richards ~ Texas Cavalry Civil War Veteran Member Darnell's 18th Regiment

Stratford Wade Hampton Richards
August 14, 1825 - July 21, 1900
Elender Caroline Cooper
September 30, 1825 - April 11, 1899
"I know that my Redeemer Liveth." ~ Job XIX, 25


May 27 ~ in 1864 on a Friday morning Stratford Wade Hampton Richards, along with the other members of Darnell's 18th Regiment, Texas Cavalry, fought in The Battle of Pickett's Mill. "Almost 25,000 men fought the terrain, the heat, the fear and each other in an area that became known as 'the hell hole' to surviving veterans." See Battle of Pickett's Mill


Stratford Wade Hampton Richards
Citizen of the Republic of Texas Seal
Double Monument in West End Cemetery
Stephenville, Erath County, Texas
Cemetery Section 9, Corner W. Washington and S. Lillian Street has a round bronze marker on top from the "Daughters of the Republic of Texas " which reads: "Citizen of the Republic of Texas " encircling a Texas star.

An Overview of Stratford's Military Career in Darnell's 18th Regiment, Texas Cavalry

18th Cavalry Regiment was organized at Dallas, Texas, during the spring of 1862 with men from Dallas, Denton, and Belton. The unit was soon dismounted and ordered to Arkansas where in January, 1863, it was captured at Arkansas Post. After being exchanged, it was consolidated with the 17th, 24th, and 25th Texas Cavalry Regiments (dismounted), and placed in Deshler's, J.A. Smith's, and Granbury's Brigade. This command fought with the Army of Tennessee from Chickamauga to Nashville and ended the war in North Carolina. The 18th was organized with about 900 men. The 17th/18th/24th/25th sustained 200 casualties at Chickamauga and totalled 690 men and 520 arms in December, 1863. Very few surrendered on April 26, 1865. The field officers were Colonel Nicholas H. Darnell, Lieutenant Colonel John T. Coit, and Majors Charles C. Morgan and William A. Ryan.



Richards Ancestors Found Themselves in
Midst of War

Stratford Hampton’s parents, Charles Harrison Richards and Polly Sapp had several children before they moved into Texas, Stratford being one of them. He was about eight years old when his family traveled the El Camino Real, into the Piney Woods and settled near the town of San Augustine around 1833.


Mary Sapp Richards Born in Georgia

Polly “Mary” Sapp Richards was born in Georgia on July 30, 1797 and died in 1879 in Buena Vista, Shelby County, Texas. Names tended to run in families, especially in our ancestors’ day. Have you ever wondered where Stratford might have come from? Well, I don’t know if it was the first time Stratford was used, but you will find that one of Mary’s brothers was named Stratford, too. Maybe she was particularly fond of him, and decided to name one of her children after him. Stratford Henry Sapp, born 1802, was born in Cooke County, Texas, and died in 1884. Mary was about 5 years old when he was born, so maybe she helped take care of him and thought of him often when they moved away from one another. She probably had a soft spot in her heart for her 4th born son.
http://genealogytraces.blogspot.com/2009/03/mary-sapp-richards-born-in-georgia.html


SOURCES:
PHOTOGRAPHS:
RICHARDS, Stratford Wade Hampton, gravestone monument, Stephenville West End Cemetery, Erath Co., Texas, Digital Format, taken by Casey Cox and shared with Judith Richards Shubert by iPhone, accessed 4-15-2014.

Genealogy Traces Links, written by Judith Richards Shubert for http://genealogytraces.blogspot.com/

Darnell's 18th Regiment, http://www.nps.gov/civilwar/accessed 5-3-2014.


Thursday, May 1, 2014

Alligators and Wagon Wheels ~ Homesley and Mosleys Going to St. Louis

HOMSLEY STORIES
by
Len Holmes
  

REMEMBRANCES 
OF
 EARL HERBERT MOSLEY
14 January 1892 - 14 July 1984

Son of
John Kimble MOSLEY (1868-1962)
Martha Elizabeth REED (1872-1943)

Grandson of
Benjamin Franklin MOSLEY (1841-?)
  Mary Ann "Mollie" HOMESLEY (1843-?)

Great-grandson of
George Washington HOMESLEY (Abt. 1807-Abt.1846)
Eleanor C BROWN (1821-1872)

2nd Great-grandson of
Joseph HOMESLEY (1780-1822)
Barbary FOULKES ((1780-1845)

3rd Great-grandson of
Benjamin HOMESLEY (1748-1824)
Jemimah SELF (Abt. 1740-1820)

4th Great-grandson of
unknown HOMERSLEY (?-1759)
Jane UNKNOWN (?-1761)



HOMSLEY STORIES ARE TRUE STORIES OF A PIONEER AMERICAN FAMILY

We document the historical evidence so that future generations may understand the migrations of their ancestors.


Thanks to a printed funeral program and Earl Herbert Mosley’s
King James Bible and family...

We know that Earl Herbert Mosely and Onnie Elizabeth Little married on Christmas Day 1911 at Ranger, Texas. Courtney MacAdams and Marty Lewis MacAdams witnessed the marriage with Jack Neighbors, celebrant. It is said that the MacAdams are cousins of the Mosley family.
Special thanks to KATHLEEN BLANTON who gathered this data.
 
  


Family stories tell about the Mosley and Homesley families
migrating to St. Louis, Missouri. It is believed St. Louis is where
the Earl Herbert Mosley and Onnie Little families knew one another.
The 1870 United States Census data lists
MOLLIE HOMESLEY with her husband
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN MOSLEY
residing in ST. LOUIS COUNTY, CENTRAL TOWNSHIP




EMIGRATION TO
TEXAS


JOHN KIMBLE MOSELY

IS ELEVEN YEARS OF AGE
HIS FAMILY KNEW HIM AS JK AND HE WAS OFTEN CALLED “BABY”
He was Scotch, Irish and Dutch (dark skinned because of being Black Dutch)
North American Index Marriages on CD --- LDS Film # 1,034,619
Ellis County, Texas marriages lists the marriage of
J. K. Mosley and Martha Reed

16 Dec 1889
JK MOSLEY MARRIES MARTHA REED
FERRIS, ELLIS, TEXAS




EARLE HERBERT MOSLEY IS BORN
WAXAHACHIE, ELLIS, TEXAS
1892

WHEN EARLE HERBERT WAS TWO TO FOUR YEARS (1894-1898) OLD
HE REMEMBERED HIS GRANDMOTHER WHO WAS A VERY SHORT LADY WITH BLACK EYES WHO WAS ALWAYS LAUGHING; UNDOUBTABLY,
HE WAS REFERRING TO MARTHA REED MOSLEY.

ONE AMAZING STORY IS THAT HE RECALLS AN ALLIGATOR BEING
TIED TO THE WHEEL OF A WAGON. HE REMEMBERS BEING TERRIFIED
OF THE ALLIGATOR AS IT THRASHED ABOUT ON THE WHEEL.





EMIGRATION TO
MARCOPIA, ARIZONA


It is known that JOHN KIMBLE MOSLEY died 02 Jun 1962
Tempe, Maricopa, Arizona, and MARY MARTHA REED MOSLEY
died 1943, Phoenix, Maricopa, Arizona

It is known that Earl Herbert Mosley
died 1984 Phoenix, Maricopa, Arizona.
The children of Earl Herbert and Onniel Elizabeth Little Mosley
TRUMAN SLIDELL MOSLEY (1912-1933)
TRAVIS “PINK” MOSLEY (1913-1991)
LOLA ELIZABETH MOSLEY (1917-1993)
ODEL HOWARD MOSELY (1920-2002)


These names are listed in hopes that the descendants may share
insight into the Homsley family tree, because these Mosley families
in Arizona are direct descendants of the
Cumberland County, Virginia family that migrated.





Info gathered by Kathleen Blanton through family members from a printed funeral program
Bible of Earl H. Mosley

"Pedigree Resource File," database, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.2.1/94C5-5NY : accessed 2014-04-29), entry for Earl Herbert MOSLEY, submitted by dwcotter1143920.

Earl Herbert MOSLEY
14 January 1892 - 14 July 1984   (Ancestral File Number: 41D2-Z0P



Thursday, April 17, 2014

BAILEY ANDERTON HOMSLEY AND FAMILY




Married to Sarah Winfred Giles October 03, 1867
Bailey Anderton Homsley and Sarah had the following children:




Thomas Chamberlain Homsley (1871 - 1944)
Eugene Via Homsley (1877 - 1983)
Charles Bailey “Cisco” Homsley (1879 - 1962)
Lillian Sarah Homsley Jenkins (1888 - 1983)
Bertha Evalyn Homesley Shelnutt (1891 - 1988)
Lucie Homsley (1 Oct 1873 - 25 Feb 1874)


Bailey Anderton Homsley ~ Man of Many Adventures

Bailey Anderton Homsley


BAILEY ANDERTON HOMSLEY
1838-1927

Bailey was born in Warren County, Missouri, February 22, 1838, left home when he was 14, and traveled widely with many colorful adventures. Remarkably surviving the Oregon Trail, Bailey explored many of the western states, mined for gold in California, freighted in Montana, and fought at the age of sixteen in the Indian Wars with the Oregon Mounted Volunteers. He then traveled by boat via Cape Horn before returning to Warren CountyMissouri. He married Sarah Winfred Giles on October 03, 1867.

Homsley Reunion, Seymour, Texas

Homsley Reunion, Seymour, Texas
RECOGNIZE THESE HOMSLEY MEN? CONTACT ME - judyshubert@yahoo.com
Copyright (c) 2014 by Judith Richards Shubert